Online Protest: power to the people?

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Witnessed: 10302 times

Social media has opened up new ways for people to communicate,
organise and campaign.

But in what ways are people using social media for political
ends? Looking at examples from around the world we will be
examining the ways in which new tools are being used and the ways
they have been used to challenge authority.

What can we learn about both the potential of web and phone
technology and what are their limitations. Can online buzz be
translated into tangible effects? Or has as been claimed with the
case of the Green protests in Iran, has the role played by social
media been hyped by an over-excited mainstream media?

Join us for a discussion at the Frontline Club that will also
discuss the impact of social media on journalism. From monitoring
Twitter to Wikileaks, how is social media changing the activity of
journalism?

Chaired by Deborah Bonello, founder of mexicoreporter.com and FT
video journalist.

With:

Benjamin Chesterton, radio documentary and photofilm producer,
co-founder of the production company duckrabbit and the website A
Developing Story;

Mike Harris, public affairs manager of Index on Censorship and
manager of Libel Reform Campaign;

Sina Motalebi, BBC Persian TV head of output and author of one
of Iran's first blogs Rooznegar who was detained for 23 days in
solitary confinement as a result of his work;

Sunny Hundal, editor of the left-wing blog Liberal
Conspiracy.

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